Archive | June, 2018

Oops!

24 Jun

You may be scratching your heads about my last piece. I mistakenly posted it here instead of on my travel blog. At least it had to do with cooking!

Apologies, and I’ll try to be more careful.

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Everett Eats!

24 Jun

EverettEatsFrontCover20180523It’s opening week at Chautauqua, and the opening night concert last night was by Allison Krause — wonderful! Most of the other weekly people arrived yesterday, and most of the all-season people have arrived by now. Our first guests arrive today. The only reason we ourselves can enjoy Chautauqua is because the Everett House week starts and ends on Sunday instead of Saturday — but I think in all our time here we’ve only met one other Shabbat-observant couple.

Last year, our first as the Everett House host couple, we had a lot of requests for breakfast recipes. Since Joe knows a thing or two about book production, over the winter we produced a little cookbook we called Everett Eats, with about 60 recipes — not all made here, but all made by me at some point and good for breakfast or brunch. We’re selling them for $18 (with the expectation that those with only $20 bills will say “Keep the change”!) The book was introduced this morning at a meeting of the program committee, and by the end of the meeting we had sold three copies!

I wanted to continue baking and freezing today but a couple of Everett machers had a huge “welcome back” reception for 70 of their closest  friends at lunchtime (plus they invited us). Luckily we don’t have to do that. Tracy, who runs I Can Do That, the company that does our housekeeping and maintenance, is also a caterer, so she’s had the kitchen tied up until mid-afternoon. The upside of events catered by Tracy is that we usually get great leftovers. And we sold two more cookbooks!

I baked a cake for today’s program committee meeting and only half got eaten, so I have enough (almost) fresh cake for tomorrow’s breakfast.

One of the program committee members shared an interesting story — two, actually. Last summer, she became very ill and had to leave early. Turns out she had an aggressive form of cancer and ended up spending significant time at Sloane-Kettering. She was assigned both a psychologist and psychiatrist who were interested in her decision not to learn any details about her illness or proposed treatment — and she is a “Type A” person. She says she turned everything over to her kids, and all she wanted to know was what she had to do day by day, so she could use all her energy for that and not have to think or worry about what was coming later. The psychologist was so taken with her decision that he is using her story in his training classes for all the psychologists and psychiatrists at the hospital, so that they will learn not to argue with other patients who make a similar choice.

She also said shortly after she returned home from treatment her little poodle started vomiting and diarrhea, and he was never sick. After a day or so, she realized he had been licking her and ingesting enough chemo through her skin to make himself ill. She stopped letting him lick and he got better without having to go to the vet. Who’d a thunk?

Cinnamon Rhubarb Bread

15 Jun

Rhubarb breadIt’s rhubarb season! We have just a little bit of rhubarb (one struggling plant) in our garden, but we had a half-dozen stalks and were wondering what to do with it. Then I moved a folder in the kitchen rack where I collect coupons and menus and such, and out popped this recipe that I don’t even remember clipping. It was developed by the Heart Smart folks at Henry Ford Health System and printed in the Detroit Free Press, probably last year. I had just enough rhubarb (though I felt it could have used a little more). The best thing is you don’t have to cook the rhubarb first, just chop it up.

I didn’t have any whole-wheat flour so I used all-purpose. Maybe that’s one reason the bread seemed so light.

Ingredients:

¾ cup diced rhubarb
1 cup plus 2 Tbs.  sugar, divided
1 container (5.3 ounce) low-fat plain Greek yogurt (about
⅔ cup)
¼ cup canola oil
1 large egg
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
¾ cup all-purpose flour
¾ cup white whole-wheat flour
1 Tbs. ground cinnamon
1 tsp.baking powder
½ tsp. baking soda
⅛ tsp. salt

Strawberry Glaze:
1 Tbs. strawberry jam
⅓ cup powdered sugar
1 to 2 tsp. water

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray an 8-by-4-inch loaf pan with baking spray (or use a parchment-paper pan liner); set aside. In a small bowl, toss rhubarb and 2 tablespoons sugar; set aside.

In a large bowl, cream together remaining 1 cup sugar, yogurt, oil, egg, and vanilla with an electric mixer.

In a separate bowl, combine all-purpose flour, whole-wheat flour, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Stir flour mixture into sugar mixture until just moistened, being careful not to over mix. Gently fold in rhubarb and its juices. Bake for 45 to 55 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean.

To prepare glaze: Heat jam until easy to stir. Add powdered sugar and stir. Thin glaze with 1 to 2 teaspoons water. Spread glaze over top of bread while warm.

Cool bread in pan on wire rack for 20 minutes. Remove bread  from pan and cool completely on wire rack.

Makes 12 slices