Archive | Breakfast RSS feed for this section

Passover Granola

28 Mar

Passover GranolaI was a little hesitant about trying to make granola out of matzo. If you’ve ever tried one of those Passover cold cereals you’ll understand! But there’s a new product out this year called Matzola, a granola-like snack. I had a sample at a women’s event a few weeks ago and it’s very tasty. Only problem is it costs about $7 for a small can. So I went online to look for a recipe for Passover granola and found this one that originally appeared in the Los Angeles Times. It’s very nice mixed with yogurt for breakfast — and it’s also a tasty snack!

Ingredients:

2 cups matzo farfel
1 cup unpeeled almonds, cut in half or coarsely chopped
½  cup shredded sweetened coconut
½ cup honey
¼  cup oil
½ cup raisins
½ cup diced dried apricots

Directions:

Heat the oven to 325 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Combine the farfel, almonds and coconut in a large bowl. Pour in the honey and oil and mix well. Let it sit for 5 or 10 minutes. Spread the mixture on the baking sheet.  Bake until golden brown, 20 to 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. (It tends to get cooked faster at the outer edges of the baking sheet. Check it frequently to make sure it doesn’t burn.)

Add the raisins and apricots and toss well. Transfer to a platter and cool completely. (It will seem a little “wet” when it comes out of the oven, but it gets more solid as it cools.) Store in an airtight container.

Advertisements

Bread Pudding

20 Mar

Bread PuddingThis is obviously not a Passover recipe — but there’s a connection! I was cleaning out my freezer for Passover and discovered a huge cache of my husband’s homemade challah (a subject for a future post!). We keep lots of not-kosher-for-Passover foods over the holiday, putting it away in a cupboard we don’t use for that week and actually selling it (via our rabbi) to someone not Jewish. But we never keep bread — the quintessential forbbiden food — over Passover. But I couldn’t bear to throw away one large and two small loaves of perfectly good bread! My solution — bread pudding, which I love any time of the year. With so much bread, I made a large one, so we’ll be enjoying some yummy breakfasts (and maybe some desserts) between now and Monday.

The only downside was that I didn’t have time to let the bread get really dried out. Usually I let the bread cubes sit in a bowl on my counter for a good few days before I make bread pudding.

This is almost more of a method than a recipe, because you can change it in so many ways. You can reduce the size of the pudding easily by reducing the ingredients proportionately. You can change the flavor by using different dried fruits (e.g. cherries, apricots) or by adding chopped fresh fruit (e.g. tart apples, pineapple, peaches, blueberries). You can even add chocolate chips or chopped nuts. You can substitute maple syrup for the brown sugar. You can substitute almond extract for the vanilla.

Ingredients:

8 cups cubed stale bread, crusts removed (challah works great)
6 eggs
3 cups milk
¼ cup brown sugar (use ½ cup or even a little  more if you plan to serve it as a dessert rather than a breakfast or brunch dish)
2 tsp. vanilla
1 tsp. cinnamon
Pinch of salt
½ cup raisins
2 Tbs. butter

Directions:

Beat the eggs, and then beat in the milk, brown sugar, vanilla, cinnamon and salt. Pour the custard over the bread cubes and mix well so the bread is completely soaked. Mix in the raisins. Turn into a greased baking dish, and dot with butter. Cover the dish and refrigerate overnight or for at least a few hours.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees and remove baking dish from refrigerator to come to room temperature.

Bake, uncovered, about an hour until the pudding is puffed and golden and a knife inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool at least 15 minutes before serving (the pudding will sink a bit). Serve hot or at room temperature.

Serves 6 to 8

Michigan Baked Oatmeal

20 Jan

ImageWe had a great breakfast today! I don’t make this too often because it takes about an hour (most of it for baking), but it’s just the thing for a lazy winter Sunday.

I first saw this recipe for Michigan Baked Oatmeal in a newspaper. I cut it out and tried it, and then lost the clipping, so I searched online for it. The same recipe appears on many recipe sites – probably because it’s so good! With oats, apple, nuts and dried cherries and lots of milk, it’s very healthy and may be a good way to get picky kids to eat a healthy breakfast!

Since there are only two of us at home most of the time, I usually halve the recipe; the only tricky part is finding a small apple or using only half of a large apple. If you don’t have dried cherries handy, you can easily substitute Craisins or any other dried cranberries. And you can vary the recipe by using vanilla or cinnamon instead of almond flavoring and use different dried fruits or nuts.

This recipe is quite sweet, so you can cut back on the brown sugar if you like it less sweet. Michigan Baked Oatmeal keeps well for a few days in the refrigerator and can be reheated in the microwave with a little additional milk.

Ingredients:

2 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
½ tsp. almond flavoring
½ cup sliced or slivered almonds
1 large apple, unpeeled and grated
¼ cup brown sugar
½ cup dried cherries
Pinch of salt

4 cups milk

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Coat a 3-quart baking dish or casserole with cooking spray. Combine all the ingredients in the baking dish (add the milk last) and stir well. Bake uncovered for 45 minutes and serve hot.

Serves 6 – 8