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Panko Parmesan Tilapia with Lemon-Caper Sauce

27 Dec

tilapia-with-lemon-caper-sauceHere’s a nice fish recipe that’s fancy enough for company. It’s a bit of a patchke, but on these long winter days, especially when things have slowed down somewhat for the holidays, why not try out something a little complicated?

You can easily halve the recipe. If you do, start out with one egg and 2 Tbs. water. You can quickly beat up another egg if you have to.

Ingredients:

1 cup flour
3 large eggs
¼ cup water
1 cup panko breadcrumbs
1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 Tbs. parsley flakes
2 lb. boneless skinless tilapia fillets
Kosher salt and pepper to taste
Olive oil for frying
1 cup dry white wine
2 tsp. chopped garlic
Juice of one lemon
2 Tbs. capers
¼ cup chopped fresh parsley or scallions

Directions:

Place the flour in a shallow bowl. Beat the eggs and water in another shallow bowl. In a third shallow bowl, combine the panko crumbs, Parmesan cheese and parsley flakes.

Dredge each piece of fish in the flour, then egg mixture and then the panko mixture. Place coated fillets on a plate in a single layer.

Preheat oven to 325 degrees and line a baking sheet with a few layers of paper towel.

Heat a small amount of olive oil in a large skillet over medium high heat until hot. Add the fish, but do not crowd the pan. Cook the fish on both sides until golden, 3 to 5 minutes per side. Transfer to the baking sheet when cooked and keep warm in the heated oven until all the fillets are cooked.

Make the sauce by adding the garlic to the pan and cooking for 1 minute. Add the wine, lemon juice and capers and cook until the sauce is reduced to about a half-cup. Stir in the parsley or scallions and pour over the fish.

Serves 6

Honey Lime Tilapia

31 May

Tilapia Honey Lime

I recently made this tasty dish using “Dover” sole that I bought at Trader Joe. Dover sole is Joe’s favorite fish, and while this may have been sole, the package said it was wild-caught in the United State, so it doesn’t seem likely that the fish actually swam over from Dover, England before being caught. I know Dover sole has become kind of a generic name, but we’re sticklers for accuracy around here!

No matter, this is a nice recipe that’s a good choice for a light summer supper, and it’s pretty easy to make. You could also use flounder or any other thin, mild, white fish.

Honey Lime Tilapia

Parve

This recipe comes from Mel’s Kitchen Café (www.melskitchencafe.com).

Ingredients:

4 tilapia fillets, about 4-5 oz. each
2 Tbs. lime juice (1 large lime)
Zest of 1 lime
1 Tbs. olive oil
1½ Tbs. honey
½ tsp. salt
½ tsp. black pepper
1 clove garlic, minced
½ cup all-purpose or whole wheat flour
¼ tsp. salt
¼ tsp. black pepper
1-2 Tbs. olive oil

Directions:

In a small bowl, whisk together the lime juice, lime zest, olive oil, honey, salt, pepper and garlic.

Place the tilapia in a gallon-sized Ziploc bag and pour the marinade over the fish. Press the air out of the bag and seal. Refrigerate the fish for at least an hour and up to 4 hours (lay the bag in a flat dish and turn it over once or twice during the marinading time).

Whisk together the flour, salt and pepper in a shallow dish like a pie plate. Dredge each tilapia fillet in the flour, coating both sides lightly, and set the fillets aside.

Heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat until rippling and hot. Cook the fillets for 3 to 5 minutes per side without moving the fish while it cooks on each side. Adjust the cooking time as needed depending on the thickness of the fish and the heat of the skillet. Work in batches as necessary to avoid crowding the fish.

Serve immediately with lime wedges.

Serves 4

Crustless Salmon Quiche

9 Jun

crustless salmon quiche 2Another winning recipe from my friend Greta Zalman!

The recipe calls for starting with fresh salmon, which you poach, but I find it works best for me as a way to use leftover salmon. It doesn’t have to be poached — baked salmon works fine, even if it has a glaze on it, as long as the glaze isn’t too overpowering. If you start with cooked salmon, just ignore the first line of the directions, but cut the leftover salmon into 1-inch chunks.

When I made this recently I didn’t have any scallion so I substituted 1/3 cup finely chopped onion.

This makes a very nice brunch dish. If you are serving a large crowd or bringing it to a large potluck, you can double the amounts and bake it in an 8 x 13-inch baking dish.

Ingredients:

¾ lb. skinned and boned fresh salmon, cut into 1-inch cubes
3 Tbs. flour
1 Tbs. fresh dill or 1 tsp. dried dill
½ tsp. salt
¼ tsp. black pepper
4 large eggs
1 Tbs. Dijon mustard
1¼ cups milk
½ cup thinly sliced scallions, including the green part
2 Tbs. chopped fresh parsley or 2 tsp. dried parsley
½ cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese
¼ tsp. paprika
Lemon wedges for garnish, optional

Directions:

Bring ½ cup of water to boil in a medium skillet. Add the salmon, reduce the heat and cover. Cook until the salmon is almost cooked through – about 3 to 4 minutes. Discard the poaching broth.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In a large bowl, stir together the flour, dill, salt and pepper. Whisk in the eggs, 2 at a time, and then the mustard and the milk. Stir in the scallions and parsley and all but 2 Tbs. of the cheese. Stir in the poached salmon cubes.

Lightly spray a 9-inch glass pie pan or porcelain quiche pan with vegetable cooking spray or lightly brush with oil. Pour in the mixture; make sure the salmon is distributed evenly. Sprinkle the top with paprika and the reserved 2 Tbs. cheese.

Bake for 45 minutes until puffed and set. Cool for 15 minutes before serving. Cut into wedges and serve hot with lemon wedges on the side.

Serves 6

 

Indian Fish Curry

28 Apr

fish curryThis came from a friend, Elaine Stein, who got it from allrecipes.com and modified it slightly, using a little less cayenne pepper and adding the green beans, which is a great idea. Even with this amount of cayenne it was plenty spicy, so if you don’t like it hot, use just a dash of cayenne. I added the suggestion of using parsley for garnish if you like, instead of cilantro, which many people don’t really like.

The recipe looks complicated but it’s really not.

Ingredients:

Marinade:
2 tsp. Dijon mustard
¾ tsp. ground black pepper
¼ tsp. salt
1½ Tbs. canola oil
4 fillets firm white fish (cod works well), about 1½ lb.)

Paste:
1 onion, coarsely chopped
4 cloves garlic, coarsely shopped
1-inch piece ginger root, peeled and chopped
20 raw cashew pieces
1 Tbs. oil

Spices (mix in a small dish):
½ tsp. cayenne pepper
½ tsp. ground turmeric
1 tsp. ground coriander
½ tsp. salt
1 tsp. sugar

Sauce:
½ cups chopped tomatoes
¼ cup vegetable broth or water
½ lb green beans, cut in half
¼ cup chopped cilantro or parsley for garnish

Directions:

Mix the mustard, black pepper, salt and oil in a zip-lock bag and add the fish. Marinate in the refrigerator for about 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Mix the onions, garlic, ginger and cashews in a blender or food processor and pulse until the mixture forms a paste. Heat the 1 Tbs. oil in a skillet over medium-low heat and stir-fry the paste for1 to 3 minutes. Add the spice mixture and cook for another 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes and broth or water and heat through.

Layer the fish in a greased baking dish, top with the green beans and then sauce. Cover and bake for about 30 minutes, or until the fish flakes easily. Garnish with cilantro or parsley and serve with cooked basmati rice.

Serves 4

Orange-Glazed Spicy Salmon

11 Mar

Orange-Glazed Spicy SalmonThis was adapted from a recipe by Kate Lawson that originally appeared in the Detroit News.

Ingredients:

3 Tbs. Cajun seasoning*
1 tsp. brown sugar
¼ tsp. kosher salt
4 salmon fillets
2 Tbs. vegetable oil
¼ cup orange marmalade
1 Tbs. lime juice
Lime wedges for garnish

Directions:

Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees.

Combine seasoning with sugar and salt and rub over surface of fillets. Roast for 10 minutes.

Blend the marmalade and lime juice. Remove the fish from the oven and brush with the glaze. Return to the oven and cook another 2 to 5 minutes, until salmon flakes easily with a fork. Serve with lime wedges.

Serves 4

* If you don’t have Cajun seasoning on hand, you can make your own:

2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. garlic powder
2½ tsp. paprika
1 tsp. ground black pepper
2 tsp. onion powder
1 tsp. cayenne pepper
1¼ tsp. dried oregano
1¼ tsp. dried thyme

Sweet and Sour Halibut

28 Jan

Sweet & Sour FishI’ve had this recipe in my collection for almost 40 years, and finally — finally! — had a the time to make it and all the ingredients on hand, sort of.

I didn’t have halibut, so I used mahi-mahi, which worked fine. I didn’t have apricot nectar so I used pineapple juice. In fact, you will get about the right amount of juice by draining a can of pineapple chunks.

My dad is the one who gave me this recipe. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, he made several business trips abroad. On one United Airlines flight, maybe to Japan, he was served this dish, and they distributed the recipe to the passengers, printed on a sheet of nice, heavy paper. Those sure were the good old days of air travel – I bet he wasn’t even in Business Class!

The dish is kind of a bother to make, so I waited until I had company — my daughter, son-in-law and granddaughter were visiting. (Of course my granddaughter’s immediate 3-year-old reaction, before even tasting it, was “I don’t like it!”) The dish was a hit! My daughter said it tasted like the sweet-and-sour fish we used to order in Chinese restaurants when she was a child.

A couple of hints: This recipe makes an enormous amount of sauce. You can easily halve it, or make it and save half the sauce to use another time, which is what I did. And I don’t have a deep-fryer, so I used a wok to cook the fish. I fried it in small batches, drained the fried cubes on paper towel and kept them warm till I was ready to serve.

Ingredients:

1 cup white vinegar
1 cup apricot nectar or pineapple juice
1 cup brown sugar
1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
½ cup ketchup
2 tsp. cornstarch mixed with 2 tsp. water
2 cups pineapple chunks (1 can), drained
1 cup green or red pepper, cut in 1-inch pieces
2 medium tomatoes, peeled and cut into eighths
1½ lb. halibut (or other firm, white fish), cut into ¾-inch cubes
3 Tbs. cornstarch
3 Tbs. water
1 Tbs. soy sauce
Salt and pepper
Oil for frying

Directions:

Prepare the sauce by combining the vinegar, apricot nectar, brown sugar, Worcestershire sauce and ketchup in a medium saucepan. Simmer 30 minutes. Thicken with 2 tsp. cornstarch blended with 1 tsp. water. Add the pineapple, pepper and tomatoes. Keep warm.

Mix 3 Tbs. cornstarch, 3 Tbs. water and the soy sauce to a paste. Dip the halibut cubes into this batter to coat lightly and deep fry in a wok or saucepan. Drain and place in a serving dish. Pour the sauce over.

Serve with rice.

Serves 6

Maple-Glazed Salmon

23 Jul

Maple Glazed Salmon

Here’s another Tuesday Twofer, because I can’t decide which of these two yummy recipes I prefer. I clipped the second one from a local newspaper and put it in my bulging “recipes to try” folder. Then when I wanted to make it, I couldn’t find the clipping. That happened all too often, which is why I embarked on my massive get-my-recipes-organized project, which led to this blog. But that’s beside the point.

Anyway, when I couldn’t find the clip, I went to the Web to search for the recipe. That usually works, but this time I couldn’t find a recipe that was the same as what I remembered. So I used another recipe that sounded good. And then, of course, the clipping resurfaced.  By the way, the clip of the second recipe says it originally came from a 2000 article in Cooking Light magazine.

I’ve made both these recipes and they’re both very good. You may be more likely to have the ingredients for the first one  — but if you do have hoisin sauce, fresh ginger and Chinese five-spice powder on hand, give the second one a try. The only caveat I will offer is this: use real maple syrup, not the God-awful maple-flavored sugar or corn syrup. You can buy real maple syrup for a reasonable price at Costco and Trader Joe’s.

The first recipe makes more marinade than you will probably need. You might want halve the recipe or set aside half the marinade in the refrigerator for later use, which is what I did.

The first recipe says “broil or grill,” while the second says “broil” — but I bet you can grill it with equal success.

Maple-Glazed Salmon 1

Ingredients:

¼ cup grapefruit juice or ¼ cup orange juice
¼ cup maple syrup
3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon olive oil
4 salmon fillets
salt and pepper, to taste

Directions:

Combine grapefruit (or orange) juice, maple syrup, balsamic vinegar and garlic in a saucepan over medium high heat. Bring to a boil and cook 5 to 6 minutes. Stir in oil.

Season salmon with salt and pepper to taste.

Brush salmon generously with glaze and grill or broil for 10 minutes, occasionally brushing with glaze.

Serves 4

Maple-Glazed Salmon 2

Ingredients:

2 Tbs. maple syrup
1½ Tbs. apple or orange juice
1½ Tbs. lemon juice
2 tsp. hoisin sauce
1½ tsp. grated ginger (fresh or from jar)
1½ tsp. Dijon mustard
¼ tsp. five-spice powder (available in Asian grocery stores)
1½-2 lb. salmon, cut in serving-size pieces

Directions:

Combine everything except the salmon in a bowl and mix well. Place the marinade in a large zip-top plastic bag, add the salmon, seal the bag and marinate in the refrigerator for 15 minutes.

Preheat the broiler.

Remove the salmon, reserving the marinade. Place the salmon, skin side down, on a broiler rack coated with cooking spray. Broil for 12 minutes, basting occasionally with the reserved marinade, or until the fish flakes easily when tested with a fork.

Serves 4 to 6